The Last Name of Jesus

 

The Last Name of Jesus
​If you were to take a poll of the average person, first question: What is Jesus’ last name? The number of those who say “Christ” would be higher than maybe some would think. Unfortunately we would be wrong in this assumption, yet often throughout scripture we find the term “Christ” following the name of Jesus. It’s importance is undeniable, but, what does it mean? What does it teach us? It is a term used nearly 500 times in the New Testament yet never defined.

​The term “Christ” highlights our glaring need for the Old Testament and understanding this helps us realise that Christ had a name long before Matthew called Him the Christ. The title “Christ” is Greek, its Hebrew counterpart would be “The Messiah”, it can the be said that “both words mean the same thing, ‘Anointed’: the ‘One Anointed’” Understanding Jesus as The Anointed one is helpful, but again is incomplete without the Old Testament. The right question to ask is “Who were anointed”? For this answer we have to look outside of the New Testament. The Old Testament writers speak often of the roles of God’s people, three roles that are of interest in regards to anointing are the positions of: Priests (Exodus 28:41; 30:30), Kings (1 Samuel 9:16; 10:1; 15:1), and Prophets (1 Kings 19:16). These three roles are the roles God set aside in the Old Testament as anointed position. They were filled by God’s chosen men to carry out God’s will.

​We then come to the New Testament where Jesus is given the title “Anointed One” (Christ), not to confuse the reader as to which role He would fill, but to show that Christ came to fill all three roles in one person. The writer of Hebrews thoroughly demonstrates that Christ is our High Priest (Hebrews 4:14; 7:26). Jesus would take up the role of High Priest after the order of Melchizedek, a priesthood that would last forever (Hebrews 5:6; 6:20). During Christ’s final week as He entered Jerusalem it would also be announced “Fear not, daughter of Zion; Behold, your King is coming, Sitting on a donkey’s colt” (John 12:16; Zech. 9:9; Revelation 19:16). Christ as King is firmly established within the New Testament, a role we know He is to fill from His very birth when we understand the term Christ. For His third position, Christians are called back to the Old Testament to show Christ as a Prophet. To Moses God would say “I will raise up for them a Prophet like you from among their brethren, and will put My words in His mouth, and He shall speak to them all that I command Him” (Deuteronomy 18:18) this is shown to be fulfilled in Christ in Acts 3:8-26.

​The title of Christ then magnificently fits Jesus and His life. To the fullest extent He accepted and fulfilled each office, yet within each position Christ was greater than any Old Testament shadow for which He would be the substance. Christ has exceeded the priests like Aaron, prophets like Elisha, and kings like David, and is the only one to hold all three positions in one person. This is why David would write of Christ as being anointed “more than [His] companions” (Psalms 45:7). Yet without our Old Testament acting as our dictionary we fall short of this marvellous definition.

Aaron Boone

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s